Lulu Celebrates the #WeNeedDiverseBooks Movement

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Earlier this week, we posted about the growing #WeNeedDiverseBooks Movement, which is drawing worldwide attention to the need to have more diversity represented in children’s literature. As part of this movement, we’d like to highlight some of our favorite Lulu children’s books that celebrate diversity.


I Am A Big Girl by Estella Johnson

I am a Big Girl by Estella Johnson

This charming story follows the daily fun of a toddler who believes she is a Big Girl. From dentist visits to finding new friends, this is a great story for young children about growing up.


Dakota’s Easter Wish by Vasilisa Hamilton

More than anything, little Dakota wants to win Pleasant Mount Sunday school’s Easter egg hunt. Indeed, she was the only child who had never won. Dakota’s Easter Wish is the humorous but touching story of how a child’s quest for a prize leads to a “malodorous” outcome.

Dakota's Easter Wish by Vasilisa Hamilton

The Lion's Share by Said Salah Ahmed

The Lion’s Share by Said Salah Ahmed

A Somali-English Bilingual Children’s Picture Book. The hungry animals of the Somali forest have worked together to kill a big fat camel. Now they must decide how to divide it. Will the portions be equal? Not with the lion in charge! Read this popular Somali fable and see why, as the other animals come to understand, “the lion’s share is not fair!”


The Pink Monkey by Kari Wells

The Pink Monkey is a fun and engaging tale about the misadventures of a little monkey hero who teaches everyone around him a valuable lesson about tolerance and acceptance of others.

The Pink Monkey by Kari Wells

I'll Find a Way by Irma Y. Luna

I’ll Find a Way by Irma Y. Luna

I’ll Find A Way is an inspiring non-fiction story of Alejandro’s perseverance and inner strength. This book will inspire and encourage young readers who are facing any type of disability in their lives to follow their dreams no matter how great the obstacles.

3 thoughts on “Lulu Celebrates the #WeNeedDiverseBooks Movement”

  1. Non piace l’idea di un Boy Scout, sfidando il sistema – e quasi prendendo verso il basso. Non hai letto la mia novella per rendersi conto di che non pubblicare eventuali indirizzi in là o indirizzi di posta elettronica – il mondo di quella novella; e-mail è inesistente in quanto non è ancora successo. Diversi libri hai avuto in quello, ma davvero scopata voi stessi su questo. Un personaggio di 12-13 anni simile all’eroe nella fantascienza distopica. Io sono la vera versione della vita di uno quei caratteri che ha interrogato la società – come come violentata esso è diventato. Quando suo hometown cresce fino..–pensare a proposito di come i giovani questo è; come e ‘ fondata nel 1959. È il clima ideale per la fantascienza distopica.

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