6 More Grammar Mistakes Writers Need to Avoid

There have been a lot of great showdowns throughout history: David vs Goliath, Yankees vs Red Sox, and…To vs Too?
We’re back with more simple grammar mistakes you should never make in your writing, featuring a whole host of matchups between similar-but-not-quite-the-same words. Take a look at the list – and our previous set of tips – and then give your book an edit to make sure you haven’t made any of these slip-ups!
Don't be like Fry. Know the difference between affect and effect.Affect vs Effect
Are you one of those people who writes “impact” because you aren’t quite sure whether you should be using “affect” or “effect”? Here’s a quick tip that will get you through most scenarios: affect is a verb – so one thing affects another – and effect is a noun. Just don’t get tripped up on “effecting change,” where you’ll use an “e” when you mean “to bring about” something.  Isn’t the English language fun (and sometimes aggravating)?
Insure vs Ensure
This one’s pretty simple. If you’re talking about insurance – as in limiting financial liability – use insure. Both start with an “i.” Ensure, when you’re guaranteeing something, is always with an “e.”
Then vs ThanCan proper grammar make you not sound like a crazy person?
Use then when something follows another thing: “I’ll learn these great grammar tips, and then I’ll proofread my books.” Than is used in comparisons: “Since I fixed all of my grammar mistakes, my book is selling better than it was before!”
I.e. vs E.g.
You might think these are interchangeable when you’re using an example, but there’s a very subtle difference between the two. I.e. mean “that is” or “in other words,” from the Latin “id est,” and you use it when you’re clarifying something. E.g., from the Latin “exempli gratia,” means “for example” and is used for just that – providing an example!
Everything you know is a lie - the fast checkout line at your store uses incorrect grammar.Fewer vs Less
As a rule of thumb, you use fewer when you can count the subject in question individually and less when you can’t. So I can have fewer cups of water than you, but your cups might have less water in them than mine do. And yes, that means your grocery store sign is probably incorrect.
To vs Too (vs Two)
Last but not least, one that you probably know but can slip your mind when you’re writing. Most of the time you’ll use to when you’re talking about a verb or going toward a place, e.g. “I’m going to write” or “I went to the mall,” but when you mean to say “as well” or “also,” or something in excess, use too – “Sally went going to the mall, too, and she ate too much.” And just in case, two is always the number 2. Seems obvious, but you can never be too careful!
That’s it – for now! The English language is a wonderful, complex thing and even the best writers get tripped up from time to time. If you’ve got a favorite tip or a “this word or that one?” that seems to always get the best of you, share them in the comments!

6 thoughts on “6 More Grammar Mistakes Writers Need to Avoid”

  1. In ‘affect vs effect’, you ask, ‘are you one of those people who writes…?’ The immediate antecedent of ‘who’ is ‘people’, therefore, the verb that comes after ‘who’ should be plural. Therefore the question should be, ‘are you one of those people who write…?’

  2. According to both the OED and the AP Style Book, the original sentence is correct; “one” is the noun so the verb must be singular,

  3. I really appreciated the information on I.e and E.g. That one has long plagued me. Thank you for sharing. Sorry. I know this is not a new tip.

  4. You should also address “loose” versus “lose.”
    Irks me to no end whenever I see loose for lose.

Join the Conversation