Worth the Struggle: Advice for Aspiring Authors

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When I first started writing, I just didn’t understand how a story was supposed to flow. No matter how many times my English teachers told me that a story should be written in such a way, I would just stare at them with a blank expression; it just didn’t make sense. But, when I wrote my first story, Day Runners, I started to understand how it should all work and how a story should be written; it was like the fog had cleared and everything was crystal clear. So, when I started writing my second story, Parallel, the experience was definitely easier.

Parallel
Parallel

While developing the premise was still tricky, as all good premises are, the details, characters, and settings flowed like a river. For once, I understood what my teachers had been telling me; the story should flow at a pace that doesn’t require it to skip details. At the same time, the story shouldn’t be so slow that extra details flood in, and obscure the plot. Day Runners took so long to write because I was trying to find my writing style and my direction. Parallel, on the other hand, was easier because my style and direction were set before I started.
I remember my eighth grade English teacher telling me that once the first book is written, the ones that follow will be a piece of cake. And while I won’t compare writing to cake, I can say that it has become easier knowing that my first book was published and that people actually enjoyed reading it. Like my first book, Parallel has received nothing but praise since it was released. The fact that I knew how the process worked and how writing should be done, helped me to continue writing, and proceed along the road I want to go.
The advice I would give to aspiring writers who are struggling is to fight through that first book; make sure it is done well, not rushed. Rushing only leads to a bad story, and can make the writer feel worse about their ability. The other piece of advice I would give is to continue writing after the first story is done. I’m not saying that having one story finished will magically turn subsequent stories into a cake walk, but it will reduce the difficulty because you understand how and what you want to write, how a good character should be developed, and how to manipulate the story in the direction you want. With each completed book, the process only gets easier.


Tristan Jensen
Tristan Jensen

About the Author

Tristan is an aspiring author who published his first book at the age of 17.  He lives in a small home in Texas with his hounds Peaches, Ian, and Missy and his fat cat, Mater, who enjoys moist food and sleeping on Tristan’s keyboard. He hopes to one day write full time.


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